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, is that we are at a true juncture. are we going to go the way of western europe or the exceptional capabilities which attract entrepreneurs for over 200 years and this is why the huge growth of government is not about numbers of gdp. it creates dependence rather than independence. it does your sense of ability to solve problems. surgery of the free markets are sensible rules of the load and creativity, get a chance to get ahead and get these ever widening circles of cooperation, breaking down barriers and enabling people to realize their dreams or do we have the same for your bread into custody and wait for the government to rise in the street like you see in europe. worse at dynamism going to come from? yes its trust to verify, but you get the rise of the internet. they get richer and deeper. and enable people to do more. that doesn't come from government. that comes from what the opportunity, with the problem, how do we solve it? this way steve jobs touched such a chord when he died late last year is precisely people sense. this is living by james had hoped 10 but anyone which th
't talk enough about it. and i've got to tell you, that's got to change in 2013. then there's europe. today, just today, i am wearing a tie that commemorates a brilliant strategy. one which works so amazingly that i'm still dazzled by it. what's happening on this tie? it's a man, a man in a suit kicking a can down the road. you see, while the europeans were kicking the can, they gave themselves time to develop a plan to allow governments and banks to raise capital and fix their respective balance sheets at lower levels than anyone thought possible. coming into the year, you know what my number one worry was? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, go to the debt markets, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of central bank backstops that really did wo
prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the bountiful energy found in america, all of the natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to building and fixing up homes in 2013 than ther
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
to happen in europe about the future whether their taxes are going to go aboard not. the problem is if you are holding on to your cash because darrell issa fear you are losing money. is that -- can you get that message out? is there a way to address the people who are so fearful, who don't want to risk a lot of their money but to recognize it just to leave it stand is not helping them at all. >> i appreciate your question. this gets to the heart of the question. people getting so focus on the fiscal cliff that they are missing the big picture. the big picture we are delivered in one way or the other when you think of things in three frameworks the the supergood growth middle and growth dealing with fiscal the leveraging in a small amount and the downside of the fiscal cliff. the first category is not something we can really obtain. the other two are the more likely categories and they are the way to invest in those areas and the portfolio of getting returned in those areas -- [talking over each other] liz: they fan your portfolio. >> they need to give away the more distant up side. don't b
parts of europe would become less risky. he basically made a goldman-sized bet at a firm that was only a sliver of goldman's size. >> the firm's stock is getting crushed yet again this morning, and mf's credit rating was cut to junk by moody's overnight. >> how can something like this be allowed to happen? how can n e individu completely shape the destiny of this firm and ultimately its demise? >> these two stories on this special ededion ontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprprprprprpp >> martin smith: it's one of america
to work with their partners over in europe. at the day of the day, this is all about increasing its exposure in the united king come as well as increasing its weaknesses in europe. it is the most lucrative airport market in the world. those gates there are the key to driving revenue. if delta can get a hold of them then it will really drive greater revenue over there. >> phil, thanks. >>> shares of dell having their best day of the year on the back of an upgrade by goldman sachs. a call out on research in motion an verizon as well. but are they the right call? we'll analyze the analysts straight ahead. >>> plus a cnbc exclusive you don't want to miss. david faber speaking with charter communications ceo thomas rutledge. his first interview since take over that top job. "power lunch" back in two. having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
things worse. europe is doing it, southern europe. it keeps raising. the economy contracts even more. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause
in europe there is a risk of social explosion in greece. >> you can still hear the gunfire being fired over the heads of the protesters, as well as heavy tier grass -- teargas shelling, but the crowd is energetic and young. >> until today, this was an atlantic city, new jersey -- this was the boardwalk in atlantic city, new jersey. hurricane sandy made by a work of it, turning it to rubble -- made light work of it, turning it to rubble. >> in the coming weeks and months, i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties. >> when adults bury a child, it goes against the laws of nature. these children will never grow to be adults. >> the air side rent is going on now. we are going to -- air siren is going on now. we are going to duck. there's usually about 20 seconds, 15 seconds. >> the new chinese chief is revealed. >> i designed it. >> the expedition to an island of ice that broke off. >> previously, both factions had tried hard to avoid such confrontation. the muslim brotherhood and the opposition are urging supporters on to the same streets on the same day. sil
.s. and europe did, for example, then we are guaranteed a 6 degree world. essentially, are urging him to step up to the world that he says he wants, to be a climate champion. we just had a press conference where the leaders of the least developed countries, the head of the african group, and small island states, shared exactly our concerns. to be honest, their voices were breaking when they spoke to us about how desperate they are about the negotiations and are clearly putting the blame on rich countries, particularly the united states, as one of the culprits. >> samantha smith, you are a leader of wwf, the world wildlife fund. >> that is what we call it in the united states. >> the level of this conference is a c within another c. if they turn one of them around, it looks like the logo of comedy central. that is funny, but not so much in the context of this subject. the news you were reading about environmentalists and the dangers they face. >> as i was preparing to come to doha, i heard about comments from someone that we are the culprits for the negotiations and the way they are going. i open
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
, the bad news with merck on the cholesterol drug already approved in europe did not approval america. they spend a lot of money to come up with nothing in this country. for these companies to go out, getting some penetration in the marketplace, one of these rumors that may be viable. this is the $20 stock back in june so there's a lot of room to the upside. we take half on these ford of things especially if you make 14% to wait three four days and take it, not all that bad a cat and a month's run. dennis: is that flighty? a good company with good prospects and a takeover possibility why shouldn't i let my -- not take half of it? charles: it is called death of coin. how often the make 4% in three days? there are other competitors out there. doesn't have to be acquired. the public perception won't be as good. there are enough and knowns to register a little bit. cheryl: thank you. dennis: 15 past the hour, stocks every 15 minutes. team coverage, jeff flock in the trading pits of the cme, all the bad weather in the midwest, first nicole petallides on the stock exchange, the dow down. ni
about this? >> sure. absolutely. so we do have patents in the u.s. and in asia, africa, and europe. but in addition to that we have an incredible team of engineers and scientists who are not only developing cook stoves but a whole range of energy technologies. and so where we really see our role as a company is in providing personal scale energy access that's affordable and safe and reliable. >> talk about affordability. how much is this? >> these stoves are $130. >> okay. now, you are in brooklyn, new york. but you don't make these here, right? >> we don't. >> you have a factory -- >> we manufacture -- we manufacture in asia. and then -- but it's all based on the designs and the engineering of the team right here in new york. >> now, i've looked at this in the videos. how long does it take me to make a pot of tea? >> four minutes. >> it takes us four minutes to boil a liter of water. that's it. >> four minutes? >> four minutes. >> well, guys, look, it is omg. i'm thrilled you that came here. this is jonathan cedar. okay? and john levy. biolite's chairman and ceo. thank you so much
for bad loans and more fee revenue get the credit. in europe, spain's finance minister warned the recession there has gotten worse. he described the current quarter's economy as the most difficult in the year since spain's recession began. the dow lost 14 points, the nasdaq down 5.5, and the s&p lost two. retail partnership-- target and >> susie: here's an unlikely retail partnership-- target and neiman marcus. in an effort to energize the early december lull in holiday shopping, the two stores are offering a unique line of designer housewares, gifts and clothing. the pieces are available at both target and neiman marcus stores and on their web sites. but, attention shoppers-- many of the hot items are going fast. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: four days after its debut, most of the much-hyped collaboration is still available at this target in edgewater, new jersey. there are gifts for your four- legged friends, and plenty of bar accessories for your partying pals, including shot glasses and cocktail shakers. there's even green transportation by alice and olivia. gone ith
challenging. >> schieffer: i know europe a coffee drinker. have you been able to drink coffee? >> no, i'm thoroughly uncalfinated right now. and it's a terrible state of human existence. i don't see how people do it. look, this has been a difficulty for me for just one week but it's a reality for americans for months at a time. i have a social media platform called waywire, where people are posting their own experiences on this, which-- and a really amazing testimony from americans. this is a daily reality. so in this time in our country where we see a decoupling between economic growth creating wealth for some but a real decoupling as wages decline. you have families whose wage wages have frozen or dropping, still working the same amount of hours, working 22 jobs and still find themselves dependent on programs like food stamps and snap, and if we cut these programs we cast them into food insecurity, which does have a long-term deleterious effect on our economy, especially as we send kids to school nutritionally unfit to learn and military families who sacrifice so much for us and veter
on what to cut, like right now, lower drug prices or pulling back our army from japan and europe. like every other country in the north does, like pulling back on positions from our army. i got the same response. it is the president's fault. i might have well have been a mannequin. they he want to talk about raising taxes of the rich. but it can't be dismissed as part of the compromise mosaic that will get the government out of the picture. they think they are so darn important down there. they think people either start or don't start businesses because of them. people start businesses to make money. i started five of them, i know. our politicians think they don't spend because they have lower tax rates. but they put people to work if there is demand and they think they can make a lot of money. they would rather save than spend. research is issued to death. what are they down there? i read some biased chart. honestly. if you raise taxes and lowered spending, we would be on top of the world. our stock markets would soar. and the level of wealth creation would be beyond washington's wild
to talk to them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school. but england, europe, undergraduate. so these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. maybe 80 people are i said i'm just a scared he to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking, and a student raised her hand, and she said, now checks and balances is very important in your constitution and the present checks -- who protects, who checks the coats? good question. not sure i had a satisfactory answer. [laughter] there is an answer. and another student raised his hand, and he said federalism is very important in america. but money goes to washington, and then it goes to the states with conditions. with grants and eight. doesn't this undermine federalism? in a student raised her hand and said now, chief justice john marshall was very much admired in the united states. for all his decisions popular when he wrote them? i said wait, stop. [laughter] i said, you knew i was coming. you
? it is interesting. one of the things that has happened is what we called eastern europe is very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathe
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
while high while illegal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> a reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> reporter: marijuana advocates argue marijuana is less debilitating than alcohol. but a new study shows those who drive within 3 hours of smoking pot are at a greater risk of causing a crash. >> it inhibits the ability to jump the judge time and distance. >> reporter: in state where marijuana is legal, the level is 5 man or grams. the impairment some argue is equal to alcohol. >> it's difficult to determine whether that five nanograms will change. >> reporter: heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> two dosages would give me 5 nanograms. it's impossible to make that determination. >> reporter: the bottom line is this is going to be litigated. the pot people want it at 10 nanograms and it's at 5. megyn: coming up. how does amer
on foreign relation, which is an important group to speak to in new york. she could go to europe and speak to yacht. she could people to the european parliament. >> bill: she'll make a lot of money giving speeches. >> she could and keep herself relevant until late -- by keeping herself out of the campaign rakes she keeps the target minimized. she's a very polarizing figure. lots of things for her critics to attack her on. the longer -- >> bill: real quick, do you expect a book from the woman? >> oh, yeah. absolutely. >> bill: okay. now, there is another woman in the c.i.a., and i want to spend a lot of time. about this woman who tracked down bin laden and then got into all kinds of trouble. do we know who this woman is? do you know her? >> yeah. we do believe we know who she is. we're not going to use her name on the program. but it's believed she was an analyst at c.i.a.'s afpac analysis unit, afghanistan and pakistan. she was an early believer that you could use -- you could track the courier system through al-qaeda in and around the cities, not the caves of pakistan, to get to bin laden
the world. the u.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second. it gives you a backdrop of the credit a availability. this gives you some backdrop that the markets in the united states have come back to an extent if you look at the es.ious asset class not as many people buying cars. the market is functioning. most of the student loans are going under the government's balance sheet. different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old. $50 billion and that market is rapidly returning. this is the slide that everybody talks about, the dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states over the past six years. securitization of volumes have $300 billion in the past six years. private credit is a huge volume. $700 billion put through the private label security system. $22 billion is overstating it. of all the slides i have, this is the most telling about where the credit is coming from. it's coming to fannie and freddie and fha. 90% of loans are effectively being guaranteed by the government. it is not just a u.s. phenomenon. europe does not use a gov
and the army family especially being over in europe. give love to daddy. he misses him. this hardest part s being the mommy and the daddy. >> merry christmas! >> how is everybody doing? >> all right. here today to receive a couple of care packages. we have ones that were packed by our rfg. they were packed especially for you. it is a by name box. we were talking about some stuff and people were saying that america has kind of foregotten about the war that has been going on for more than ten years now. for most people that is not true because you have is complete stranges and, of course, mr. chuck norris and soldier's angels who took the time out of their day and their own pocket to send you a care package. >> let you know how big he is getting even though i'm not there. like you can tell by how he does stuff. >> hi, babe. i just want to say i love you and i can't wait for you to come home. i miss you so much. >> hey, babe, have a good day. see you soon. not too much longer and you will be home. love you. bye, babe. >> i would do anything for them. and that is one -- that is pretty much my m
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
hours flight away from europe. jenna: why would we get involved there in northern mali and not get involved in other spots like syria for example, or in places like yemen where we hear there is a hotbed for terrorists at well? >> well i think part of the reason is that mali for many years a poster child of democracy and alleged stability in this region. it's a very crucial region of the just to the south of it is sub-saharan after can where we derive a great deal of our energy imports. places like nigeria and other places are very sensitive. just to the north this is libya which is still very, very unsettled. algeria which is yet to face the arab spring and reform. and north africa and egypt. this is a very critical region on the boarders of several areas that are very sensitive right now. jenna: what are the islamists doing in that area right now? >> well they're imposing their harsh brand of rule. they have destroyed a number of world heritage sites. islamic monuments ironically enough. they're imposing brutal punishments upon the people. more importantly from the security side t
security. in latin america, in africa, in europe and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the lesson that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen this approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns and iraq and afghanistan, and our counterterrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security forces assistance to a wider range of partners in order to address a broader range of security challenges in asia-pacific, in the middle east. and as i said, in europe, africa and in latin america. to implement this element of the strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war. and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the armies new structure, they are able to, in fact, engage on a rotational basis to assist other countries. the entire u.s. government is working to make our security cooperation, particularly for an military sales, more responsive and more effective, to cut through the bureaucrac
to their country of origin. >>> this is the most-watched singing contest in europe. it's got the glitz, the glamour, but -- >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly, you get a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. >> wow. what some european countries on the verge of bankruptcy, many feel participating in the contest, well, strikes the wrong chord. through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super s
europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecologically that were not good for the earth's, things that people did to maximize profits. so, that is on
volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and liberated the camp and he along with the other prisoners of war came back to america. frank buckles went bac
and paying a fine. the justice department announced agreement with hsbc the biggest bank in all of europe. as part of of the deal hsbc agrees to pay $1.9 billion in fines. a lot of money certainly. but for this bank it's the equivalent of roughly seven weeks of profits. in exchange, these are among the charges that will now disappear. laundering more than $880 million in drug money. and allowing $660 million in prohibited transactions from countries including libya, cuba, burma, sudan and iran. federal prosecutors say the bankers didn't just look the other way, they actually went a step further. one occasion hsbc instructed a bank in iran on how to format payment messages so that the transactions would not be blocked or rejected by the united states. >> shepard: in other words, the bankers told the iranians how to get around our laws. in a statement, the bank's chief executive says we accept responsibility for our mistakes. we have said we are profoundly sorry for them and we do so again. so the bank is sorry but again nobody is going to prison. prosecutors say some people at the justice
of eastern europe has become very differentiated. the don't even have much in common with one another. >> more with an applebaum on life in poland and hungary. tonight at 8:00. >> on thursday, local officials from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on.
that on a trip to europe. she had to cancel her trip to the middle east where she was expected to attend a big meeting on syria. now we hear the second suffered a lot of dehydration, fainted and we're told, her doctors say, over the course of the week they realized when she fainted she suffered a concussion. let me read you a statement from her spokesman, deputy assistant secretary. while suffering from a stomach virus secretary clinton became dehydrated and fainted sustaining a concussion. she's been recovering at home and will continue to be monitored regularly by her doctors. at their recommendation, she will continue to work from home next week, staying in contact with department and other officials. wolf, i'm told this concussion was not severe and that secretary does intend to come back to work after some recuperation and her doctor said in a statement she will make a full recovery. >> i'm sure she will make a full recovery. we're hoping for that, of course. elise, thanks very much. let's bring back chief medical correspondent, sanjay gupta. the statement from the doctors is interesting.
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